Agile Is not Easy for UX: (How to) Deal with It

Summary: Agile and UX work well together when management values UX, UX practitioners show leadership, the process isn’t strict, and UX is embedded on teams.

Agile has taken over the software-development world. In recent years, it’s become the most popular software-development methodology. Agile development has a lot of benefits: an incremental approach, the ability to change direction based on customer and stakeholder feedback, short timeframes that keep the teams focused.

However, Agile methodologies are focused on developers. They grew out of programmers’ attempts to solve common pain points experienced during big software development projects. Notoriously, the Agile Manifesto (still the primary document delineating Agile principles) did not include UX people, nor did it account for the time, resources, and research that UX professionals need in order to create excellent designs.

Summary: Agile and UX work well together when management values UX, UX practitioners show leadership, the process isn’t strict, and UX is embedded on teams.

Agile has taken over the software-development world. In recent years, it’s become the most popular software-development methodology. Agile development has a lot of benefits: an incremental approach, the ability to change direction based on customer and stakeholder feedback, short timeframes that keep the teams focused.

However, Agile methodologies are focused on developers. They grew out of programmers’ attempts to solve common pain points experienced during big software development projects. Notoriously, the Agile Manifesto (still the primary document delineating Agile principles) did not include UX people, nor did it account for the time, resources, and research that UX professionals need in order to create excellent designs.

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